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America’s most common light bulb gets LED replacement May 28, 2010

Posted by Dr. Z Bulbs in LED Lights.
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America’s most common light bulb gets LED replacement

 

Consumers will soon be able to replace the most common light bulb in U.S. households, the 60-watt incandescent, with an ultra-efficient LED, according to manufacturer Royal Philips Electronics.

This new 12-watt Philips LED light bulb, available to consumers later this year, will be able to replace 60-watt incandescents, the most commonly used light bulb in U.S. households.
By Royal Philips Electronics

 

The company unveiled its new LED at the Lightfair International trade show in Las Vegas, just two days after Home Depot announced it’s begun selling a $20 LED replacement for the 40-watt incandescent.

As incandescents begin their Congress-mandated phaseout in 2012, companies are scurrying to develop and market more efficient replacements.

Philips says its 12-watt Endura light bulb is the industry’s first to replace its century-old predecessor. The company says the LED delivers the same soft white light and dimmability but uses 80% less energy and lasts 25 times longer. The LED will be available to consumers later this year, likely in December, but its price hasn’t been finalized.

More than 425 million 60-watt incandescents are sold each in the United States, representing half the domestic incandescent market, according to Philips. The company estimates its new LED has the potential to save 32.6 terawatt-hours of electricity each year — enough to power the lights of 14% of U.S. households.

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Are CFL Light Bulbs Safe? The real story from ABC. May 21, 2010

Posted by Dr. Z Bulbs in compact fluorescent.
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Zoinks Here is a great article on the CFL’s and how to responsible use one of these little buggers! This article is taken from ABC byJohn Matarese.

https://www.zbulbs.com/

CFL Light Bulb Risks Last Update: 5/20 7:03 pm If you’re like most people, you now have at least one or two of those squiggly Compact Fluorescent Light Bulbs in your home. And you may be buying more soon. Like it or not, the government is pushing us to purchase more and more CFL’s –compact fluorescent lights — because they save energy. But do they come with extra risks the stores and government don’t want us to know about? Some homeowners are wondering: Could be also be inviting a risk of explosions, fire, and even mercury poisoning? Bulb explodes without warning Tom and Nancy Heim were watching TV recently, when Tom decided to turn on the floor lamp next to his recliner chair. “I heard this loud pop…I saw what I thought was smoke, coming out o the top of the floor lamp,” says Tom. Nancy suddenly found glass in her lap. She says, “I did not see it. I just heard it, and I noticed i had glass on me.” Their concern. The bulb could have started a fire or exposed them to dangerous mercury vapor. Risk of explosion or fire So we checked with the U.S. EPA, and found found some reassuring news. The EPA says its records show the risk of a bulb exploding is extremely rare. And in most cases it has investigated, the bulb had been damaged at some point, such as having been dropped on the floor. According to the EPA, it’s almost impossible for a CFL bulb to start a fire, as all UL approved bulbs have a safety shutoff fuse in the base. If the glass breaks, the fuse cuts out, and there no more current goes into the bulb.

Is there a  risk of mercury poisoning?

But what about the mercury vapor they may have breathed?

Last year, we asked Dr. Kim Dietrich, an Environmental Engineering Professor, to break and test a CFL bulb for mercury. Research Assistant Professor Joo-Youp Lee shattered a bulb inside a sealed bag…then put the bag on a mercury vapor analyzer.

No question, he says, the bulb contained a measurable amount of mercury.

However, Dr. Dietrich says the amount found is minuscule compared to thermometers we used to put in our mouths.

According to Dr. Dietrich, “It would take 100 shattered CFL bulbs to equal the amount of mercury in an older thermometer.”

What if a bulb breaks?

Despite that reassuring news, the U.S. EPA has a list of steps you should take if you break a bulb.

  • The EPA says open a window and ventilate the room for 15 minutes.
  • Then use cardboard to sweep up the remains of the bulb
  • Wearing rubber gloves, use a wet paper towel to wipe the area.
  • Finally, seal it all in a plastic bag, and dispose.
  • The EPA says do not vacuum the room, or you could spread mercury dust around.

The EPA says the amount in one bulb is not enough to create a health hazard.

To prevent problems

To prevent problems, and extend bulb life, the EPA suggests you:

  • Do not use CFL bulbs in bathrooms, or anywhere they will be turned on and off all day.  Frequent powering up and down reduces their life.
  • Do not use standard CFL’s in dimmer switches. Low voltage reduces their life
  • Three-way lamps are fine, however, as the contacts on the base of CFL bulbs are different from three-way bulbs, and they will not turn on with the low voltage setting.

So while a bulb explosion may scare you, it’s unlikely it will cause a fire or any real damage.

And despite Internet rumors, a broken bulb will not turn your home into a Hazmat zone.

The government says it is safe to continue using them.  As always, don’t waste your money. Is there a  risk of mercury poisoning?

But what about the mercury vapor they may have breathed?

Last year, we asked Dr. Kim Dietrich, an Environmental Engineering Professor, to break and test a CFL bulb for mercury. Research Assistant Professor Joo-Youp Lee shattered a bulb inside a sealed bag…then put the bag on a mercury vapor analyzer.

No question, he says, the bulb contained a measurable amount of mercury.

However, Dr. Dietrich says the amount found is minuscule compared to thermometers we used to put in our mouths.

According to Dr. Dietrich, “It would take 100 shattered CFL bulbs to equal the amount of mercury in an older thermometer.”

What if a bulb breaks?

Despite that reassuring news, the U.S. EPA has a list of steps you should take if you break a bulb.

  • The EPA says open a window and ventilate the room for 15 minutes.
  • Then use cardboard to sweep up the remains of the bulb
  • Wearing rubber gloves, use a wet paper towel to wipe the area.
  • Finally, seal it all in a plastic bag, and dispose.
  • The EPA says do not vacuum the room, or you could spread mercury dust around.

The EPA says the amount in one bulb is not enough to create a health hazard.

To prevent problems

To prevent problems, and extend bulb life, the EPA suggests you:

  • Do not use CFL bulbs in bathrooms, or anywhere they will be turned on and off all day.  Frequent powering up and down reduces their life.
  • Do not use standard CFL’s in dimmer switches. Low voltage reduces their life
  • Three-way lamps are fine, however, as the contacts on the base of CFL bulbs are different from three-way bulbs, and they will not turn on with the low voltage setting.

So while a bulb explosion may scare you, it’s unlikely it will cause a fire or any real damage.

And despite Internet rumors, a broken bulb will not turn your home into a Hazmat zone.

The government says it is safe to continue using them.  As always, don’t waste your money.

In the Future You Will Listen To Lightbulbs..maybe May 18, 2010

Posted by Dr. Z Bulbs in light bulb, Weird Bulb News.
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Sylvania combines speakers and light bulbs, oddly

While Sylvania isn’t the first to combine light bulbs and speakers, the idea is sound. Okay, sorry. But consider the placement of a couple of lamps in your living room. Wouldn’t those locations also be suitable for speakers? Yes? Then MusicLite is for you.

Each one of these fixtures has an array of LEDs on board that emit as much light as a 65-watt incandescent, while cranking out 25 watts of sound at the same time. The speakers are all connected wirelessly, and can be placed 90 feet away from each other. Hide a subwoofer under the couch, and you’re ready to rock.

Too bad you’ll have to wait until Fall to find out the price of these clandestine light/speaks, but if you’re itching for some now, Klipsch might beat Sylvania to the punch with the same thing, with Klipsch saying theirs are “coming soon.” However, the Klipsch models will rip you for $600. Maybe these will be cheaper.

https://www.zbulbs.com

Zoinks!Changing Light Bulbs Can Be Dangerous! May 6, 2010

Posted by Dr. Z Bulbs in Weird Bulb News.
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Gadzooks.. This story certainly illustrates the dangers of changing lightbulbs.. Climbing Everest is dangerous but climbing a ladder to change a lightbulb..that can be lethal! Our condolences go out to all who knew and loved Marco Da Pozzo.

Man survives K2 climb only to die while fixing a light bulb at ski resort

Man survives K2 climb only to die while fixing a light bulb at ski resort
In 2004, elite climber Marco Da Pozzo successfully climbed the world’s second highest mountain, K2. Recently, however, it was the act of changing a lightbulb that took his life.Marco was changing a bulb on the church roof of the Cortina D’Ampezzo ski resort in Italy when he lost his footing and slammed his body against the stone wall, causing life-ending injuries. He was wearing safety gear.

Father David Fiocco commented: “We were all looking upwards holding our hands and praying but it was in vain and now he is in the hands of Jesus”. Fellow mountaineer Franco Gaspari said: “It was a freak tragedy. He was an outstanding climber.”

Our condolences go out to all who knew and loved Marco Da Pozzo. He was 43-years-old.

Chinese man munches on 1500 ‘crispy, delicious’ lightbulbs! May 4, 2010

Posted by Dr. Z Bulbs in Uncategorized.
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Once you get past the crunchy glass shell the burst of flavor from the tungsten filament is to die for!

Zowie! Not many people are aware of the ancient practice of eating lightbulbs..Umm probably for good reason considering all the glass.. wire.. and metal… sheesh! I suppose you can develope a taste for anything. I prefer mine in their sockets.. Read below and shudder..
Dr. Z
http://www.zbulbs.com

Melbourne, May 4 (ANI): A middle-aged man claims to have eaten 1500 light bulbs over his life after developing a liking for their crispness.

Buzz up!Metro newspaper in the UK reports that Wang Xianjun, 54, of Sichuan Province, started to snack on broken glass because he says it is “crispy and delicious.”

“I accidentally swallowed a piece of thick fish bone, but nothing happened. With curiosity, I tried several pieces of broken glasses secretly and nothing happened also,” the Daily Telegraph quoted him as saying.

“I am not eating it every day, but from time to time. I only eat the light bulb during my breakfast, and each day no more than one bulb,” he said.

Wang first smashes the light bulb before swallowing it piece by piece, sipping from a glass of water. (ANI)