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ZOinks! NXP wants to give every light bulb an internet connection! Who said the future was dead? May 25, 2011

Posted by Dr. Z Bulbs in cfl.
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Gadzooks! Lightbulbs are beginning to be the cure-all for all of society’s ills! Well..maybe not but they sure aren’t the light bulbs I grew up with! Check out this article about Semiconductor manufacturer NXP vision the new internet light bulbs!

ZOinkS!

Semiconductor specialist NXP has announced an innovative new way for businesses and consumers to reduce their energy usage: smart, internet-connected light bulbs that can talk to each other.

Demonstrated this week at the LightFair International Show, NXP - in partnership with TCP and GreenWave Reality – has developed a product it calls ‘GreenChip’, which it plans to use to create ‘smart lighting’ networks by giving every light bulb its own internet connection.

Adding additional power-draining hardware to a bulb to reduce energy use might seem counter-intuitive, but NXP believes it could have a massive impact on energy efficiency, through smarter, rather than dimmer, lighting.

“The GreenChip smart lighting solution signals a fundamental shift in the way we interact with lights – at home, in the office, even outdoors,” claimed NXP’s John Croteau. “By bringing together wireless IP connectivity with our energy-efficient lighting and power conversion technologies in a compact, low-cost solution, we are transforming the way we design, control and manage lights.”

Croteau envisions GreenChip technology being used to create lights that communicate with each other and with their owners via the internet, creating ‘intelligent lighting environments’ – lights that turn on and off when they’re needed, at a predetermined level of brightness.

“Our smart lighting solution also brings us one step closer to the ‘Internet of Things’,” Croteau claimed, “a world in which every home appliance can be monitored and controlled via an IP address.”

The GreenChip network is designed to operate on the same wireless frequencies used by ‘smart meter’ technologies, potentially allowing interoperation between the two systems – and the technology behind the network, known as JenNet-IP, will be made open-source for other manufacturers to add support to their products.

NXP has announced that reference designs of its Internet-connected light bulbs are available now, but has yet to suggest when the technology will be ready for a commercial launch.

Author: Gareth Halfacree

Zoinks! New Light Bulbs are “Can Do?”?? This guy from USA Today Thinks So! February 4, 2011

Posted by Dr. Z Bulbs in cfl, compact fluorescent.
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Gadzooks! It seems everyone has an opinion about Light Bulbs these days! Nothing stirs up more conversation than saying “spiral bulb” in mixed company..Anyways this guy from USA Today thinks the “new light bulbs” are “can do”..Me to! As long as they don’t suck..

ZOinmks! Did I say that?

When it comes to energy, the United States is too often the nation of “can’t.” Can’t drill for oil in new areas offshore. Can’t build a new generation of nuclear power plants. Can’t raise gasoline taxes to discourage the use of imported oil. Can’t move quickly to site new offshore wind plants. By PR Newswire More efficient choices: Halogen, compact fluorescent and light-emitting diode bulbs. EnlargeCloseBy PR Newswire More efficient choices: Halogen, compact fluorescent and light-emitting diode bulbs. OPPOSING VIEW: Turn on the BULB Act What the nation can do is limp along with a status quo energy policy that takes many energy decisions out of Americans’ hands and weakens national security and the environment. More than half the oil Americans use is imported — a vulnerability underscored by the ongoing tumult in Egypt. Electricity production relies heavily on coal, which exacts a heavy toll on the global climate. Congress and the president spend far more time talking about these problems than solving them, but occasionally they get it right. One of those times was in 2007, when then- President Bush signed an energy bill that, among other things, raised car mileage standards and took aim at an extravangantly inefficient household item: the light bulb. The best way for government to boost energy efficiency isn’t to micromanage by picking winners and losers, a job better suited to free-market innovation. It is to set a reasonable standard — miles per gallon or light per watt, for example — and let the market sort it out. That’s what Congress did in 2007. Americans are already reaping the benefits of higher-mileage vehicles, but a rebellion is brewing against the new standard for more efficient light bulbs, which takes effect next New Year’s Day. Rep. Michele Bachmann, R-Minn., complained in a response to President Obama’s State of the Union address that the government “now tells us which light bulbs to buy.” A group of House Republicans has introduced a bill to repeal the standard..  That would be a mistake. The familiar incandescent bulb is a 125-year-old design that’s handy and cheap but a huge waster of electricity. Roughly 90% of the juice that goes to a typical bulb generates heat, not light. The new rules require bulbs to be at least 25% more efficient, starting with 100-watt bulbs. Incandescents can’t do that, so they’ll begin to disappear. There’s a huge payoff for this. The Natural Resources Defense Council estimates that fully implementing the new lighting standards would make it possible to avoid building 30 new power plants and cut CO2 emissions by 100 million tons a year. But what will Americans switch to? The most common alternative now is the compact fluorescent light (CFL), the spiral bulb that uses far less electricity than incandescents. It costs two to four times as much as an old-fashioned bulb but lasts five to 10 times as long —a big saving for consumers and country. CFLs aren’t perfect. Some people don’t like the light they give off, the delay before they reach full brightness or the extra care required because CFLs contain tiny amounts of mercury. Even so, millions of early adopters are perfectly happy with them because they reduce electricity bills. But light bulb makers know that some people hate CFLs, so manufacturers have produced an alternative: a halogen bulb that looks just like an incandescent and produces similar light but meets the new standard. You can buy them today. The evolution won’t stop there, which is the virtue of unleashing market forces. Manufacturers are working on next-generation LED bulbs that last roughly four times as long as long-lived CFLs. They’re wildly expensive now — as much as $30 to $40 or more for a single bulb — but the price inevitably will drop. Some of this innovation would have happened without the new law, but not as much, or as quickly. Faced with deadlines and a market for their new products, manufacturers intensified efforts to develop better bulbs. It would be a shame to undo that progress — and produce yet another energy “can’t.”

Zoinks!When Out to Dinner, Don’t Count the Watts- New York Times Artice June 10, 2010

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When Out to Dinner, Don’t Count the Watts By DIANE CARDWELL Published: June 7, 2010

At Maialino, the Roman-style trattoria on Gramercy Park, they hover in groups of two and three. At the Standard Grill in the meatpacking district, they snake through the cafe, restaurant and patio. And at Recipe, a rustic spot on the Upper West Side, they cluster near the entrance as an enticement. Enlarge This Image Joshua Bright for The New York Times Filament bulbs are an important part of the décor at Maialino on Lexington Avenue. Enlarge This Image Joshua Bright for The New York Times At Craft, on East 19th Street. The bulbs’ glow flatters, but they use much more energy than standard incandescent bulbs. Enlarge This Image Kate Thornton for The New York Times Bob Rosenzweig, the owner of Aamsco, in Summerville, S.C., checks a shipment of bulbs with Linda Lambert’s help. Enlarge This Image Kate Thornton for The New York Times A workstation at Aamsco, which makes and sells old-style light bulbs and fixtures and distributes vintage bulbs for others. They are not the latest cliques of beautiful people, but something quite old and plain: exposed-filament bulbs, energy-guzzling reproductions of Thomas Alva Edison’s first light bulb. And despite the escalating push to go green and switch to compact fluorescents — or perhaps because of it — their antique glow has spread like a power surge. Whether in hip hangouts tapping into the popular Victorian industrial look or elegant rooms seeking to warm up their atmosphere, the bulb has become a staple for restaurant designers, in part because it emulates candlelight and flatters both dinner and diner. The filament light is now so ubiquitous that it has prompted a backlash among those who deem it overexposed — a badge of retro cool that is fast becoming the restaurant-design equivalent of the Converse All Star. Ken Friedman, an owner of nostalgic spots like the Spotted Pig and the Rusty Knot, called the look “played out.” In a planning session last year for the Breslin, his latest take on the British gastropub, he declared, “No exposed bulbs!” And Charlie Palmer, the creator of a national hospitality empire who featured the lights in 1994 at his Flatiron district restaurant Alva said he recently dissuaded a designer from using them in a new space. “That happened 20 years ago,” he recalled saying. “It’s been done.” And yet, given all those burning amber threads dangling from cords in New York and the rest of the country, they would appear to be far from done. They remain a go-to design element, like wheatgrass in a box some years ago, for their casual air and winks at history. A lot of thought and expense go into restaurant lighting — upscale budgets easily reach six figures — because it can shape a diner’s experience almost as much as the food. Some lights favor certain colors and make others look unappetizing. But the old-fashioned bulb, though less efficient than fluorescent or L.E.D. lamps, can build an ambience at a relatively low cost. “It creates a very warm glow, through a broad spectrum with many colors,” said Paul Bentel, whose firm Bentel & Bentel hung cascades of reproduction Tesla bulbs, similar to the original Edison, throughout Craft restaurant near Gramercy Park in 2001. “A red apple will look as good as a green pear.” The Craft connection may have been the start of the boom. The bulbs became a signature there as the owner, Tom Colicchio, spread his restaurants across the country and appeared to spawn a thousand imitators. But that might not have happened without Bob Rosenzweig, who started selling the reproductions in the 1980s out of a storefront in Flushing, Queens, inspired by a fascination with the old bulbs he bought from a salvage operation on Canal Street. Priced out of Flushing, then Long Island City and Jersey City, he moved his company, Aamsco, to Summerville, S.C., a suburb of Charleston. There, he manufactures and distributes his own bulbs, as well as lights from other companies, including Kyp-Go, which has been replicating Edison’s original carbon filament bulb for nearly 50 years. “My neighbors think I’m in the witness protection program,” he said, with the brisk cadence of his Astoria upbringing. “They say, ‘Why in your right mind would you come down here to live on a dirt road in a small town? You’ve got to be hiding from somebody.’ ” He started selling the lights to collectors, theatrical prop houses and the Edison national park site in New Jersey, for its gift shop. Demand grew but did not really take off, Mr. Rosenzweig said, until shortly after the turn of the century, as consumers were being pushed to use compact fluorescents. Customers, particularly in San Francisco, complained that they hated how those squiggly bulbs looked in their vintage fixtures, casting an odd green tinge inside their restored Victorians. Around the same time came a boomlet of nostalgia-infused restaurants in New York, like Public, which opened in 2003 in a former Edison laboratory in NoLIta. “You were going to do a space that was low cost — you weren’t going to throw a ton of money at it — you wanted it as honest as possible,” Kristina O’Neal, a founder of Avroko, which designed and operates Public, said of the raw, industrial look. “But you wanted something a little bit nostalgic, a little bit about old New York, a little bit comforting, but still with your own take on it.” The bulbs are now popular all over the world, in Germany, England, Australia and even Hong Kong Disneyland, Mr. Rosenzweig said. The only place he cannot seem to find a market is Miami Beach, where the prevailing look is modern. In countries with bans on incandescent lights in homes, he markets the product as a novelty bulb. “Everybody’s going green, but we’re still hot and red,” he said. “My bulbs use a lot of energy and make the air conditioning work overtime.” In the United States, the craze has spilled over into home décor, with demand high enough that even mainstream retailers like Pottery Barn, Restoration Hardware and Anthropologie sell the lights for $9 to $20 each. It remains to be seen how all this will play out in a city where Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg has championed the compact fluorescent and restaurants crow about their connections to the earth. Mr. Bloomberg and his chief environmental aide declined to comment on the proliferation of the filament bulbs, some of which do not produce enough light to be included in the higher federal efficiency standards that begin taking effect in 2012, but can use roughly three times the energy of a standard incandescent. Although some Congressional aides say the new restrictions would not apply to the reproduction bulbs because they are not intended for general use, the Natural Resources Defense Council, which helped write the law, said it would challenge that interpretation. “It boggles the mind that in these times of economic hardship and interest in environmental sustainability that restaurant owners would choose the light bulb that uses 5 to 10 times more power than the other bulbs on the market,” Noah Horowitz, a senior scientist at the environmental group, wrote in an e-mail message. “You can’t on the one hand brag how green you are by serving organic beer and locally grown produce while you are lighting your business with the least efficient light bulbs available in the world.” Lighting designers, who tend to think in terms of overall watts used in a space as opposed to the environmental burden of a single fixture, say that most of the real illumination in restaurants can be handled by more efficient sources, with the vintage lights used as accents. For Mr. Friedman of the Spotted Pig, who said he was in a good-natured fight trying to restrain his designers from hanging hundreds of lights from the ceiling of his next restaurant, the eco-friendly and aesthetically pleasing solution is a simple one. If you want to conjure up an old-time feel, he said, “just light real candles, you know? “They’re really cheap, they use way less of New York’s energy than a light bulb. A little candle on a table — there’s nothing more old school than that.”

America’s most common light bulb gets LED replacement May 28, 2010

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America’s most common light bulb gets LED replacement

 

Consumers will soon be able to replace the most common light bulb in U.S. households, the 60-watt incandescent, with an ultra-efficient LED, according to manufacturer Royal Philips Electronics.

This new 12-watt Philips LED light bulb, available to consumers later this year, will be able to replace 60-watt incandescents, the most commonly used light bulb in U.S. households.
By Royal Philips Electronics

 

The company unveiled its new LED at the Lightfair International trade show in Las Vegas, just two days after Home Depot announced it’s begun selling a $20 LED replacement for the 40-watt incandescent.

As incandescents begin their Congress-mandated phaseout in 2012, companies are scurrying to develop and market more efficient replacements.

Philips says its 12-watt Endura light bulb is the industry’s first to replace its century-old predecessor. The company says the LED delivers the same soft white light and dimmability but uses 80% less energy and lasts 25 times longer. The LED will be available to consumers later this year, likely in December, but its price hasn’t been finalized.

More than 425 million 60-watt incandescents are sold each in the United States, representing half the domestic incandescent market, according to Philips. The company estimates its new LED has the potential to save 32.6 terawatt-hours of electricity each year — enough to power the lights of 14% of U.S. households.

Are CFL Light Bulbs Safe? The real story from ABC. May 21, 2010

Posted by Dr. Z Bulbs in compact fluorescent.
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Zoinks Here is a great article on the CFL’s and how to responsible use one of these little buggers! This article is taken from ABC byJohn Matarese.

https://www.zbulbs.com/

CFL Light Bulb Risks Last Update: 5/20 7:03 pm If you’re like most people, you now have at least one or two of those squiggly Compact Fluorescent Light Bulbs in your home. And you may be buying more soon. Like it or not, the government is pushing us to purchase more and more CFL’s –compact fluorescent lights — because they save energy. But do they come with extra risks the stores and government don’t want us to know about? Some homeowners are wondering: Could be also be inviting a risk of explosions, fire, and even mercury poisoning? Bulb explodes without warning Tom and Nancy Heim were watching TV recently, when Tom decided to turn on the floor lamp next to his recliner chair. “I heard this loud pop…I saw what I thought was smoke, coming out o the top of the floor lamp,” says Tom. Nancy suddenly found glass in her lap. She says, “I did not see it. I just heard it, and I noticed i had glass on me.” Their concern. The bulb could have started a fire or exposed them to dangerous mercury vapor. Risk of explosion or fire So we checked with the U.S. EPA, and found found some reassuring news. The EPA says its records show the risk of a bulb exploding is extremely rare. And in most cases it has investigated, the bulb had been damaged at some point, such as having been dropped on the floor. According to the EPA, it’s almost impossible for a CFL bulb to start a fire, as all UL approved bulbs have a safety shutoff fuse in the base. If the glass breaks, the fuse cuts out, and there no more current goes into the bulb.

Is there a  risk of mercury poisoning?

But what about the mercury vapor they may have breathed?

Last year, we asked Dr. Kim Dietrich, an Environmental Engineering Professor, to break and test a CFL bulb for mercury. Research Assistant Professor Joo-Youp Lee shattered a bulb inside a sealed bag…then put the bag on a mercury vapor analyzer.

No question, he says, the bulb contained a measurable amount of mercury.

However, Dr. Dietrich says the amount found is minuscule compared to thermometers we used to put in our mouths.

According to Dr. Dietrich, “It would take 100 shattered CFL bulbs to equal the amount of mercury in an older thermometer.”

What if a bulb breaks?

Despite that reassuring news, the U.S. EPA has a list of steps you should take if you break a bulb.

  • The EPA says open a window and ventilate the room for 15 minutes.
  • Then use cardboard to sweep up the remains of the bulb
  • Wearing rubber gloves, use a wet paper towel to wipe the area.
  • Finally, seal it all in a plastic bag, and dispose.
  • The EPA says do not vacuum the room, or you could spread mercury dust around.

The EPA says the amount in one bulb is not enough to create a health hazard.

To prevent problems

To prevent problems, and extend bulb life, the EPA suggests you:

  • Do not use CFL bulbs in bathrooms, or anywhere they will be turned on and off all day.  Frequent powering up and down reduces their life.
  • Do not use standard CFL’s in dimmer switches. Low voltage reduces their life
  • Three-way lamps are fine, however, as the contacts on the base of CFL bulbs are different from three-way bulbs, and they will not turn on with the low voltage setting.

So while a bulb explosion may scare you, it’s unlikely it will cause a fire or any real damage.

And despite Internet rumors, a broken bulb will not turn your home into a Hazmat zone.

The government says it is safe to continue using them.  As always, don’t waste your money. Is there a  risk of mercury poisoning?

But what about the mercury vapor they may have breathed?

Last year, we asked Dr. Kim Dietrich, an Environmental Engineering Professor, to break and test a CFL bulb for mercury. Research Assistant Professor Joo-Youp Lee shattered a bulb inside a sealed bag…then put the bag on a mercury vapor analyzer.

No question, he says, the bulb contained a measurable amount of mercury.

However, Dr. Dietrich says the amount found is minuscule compared to thermometers we used to put in our mouths.

According to Dr. Dietrich, “It would take 100 shattered CFL bulbs to equal the amount of mercury in an older thermometer.”

What if a bulb breaks?

Despite that reassuring news, the U.S. EPA has a list of steps you should take if you break a bulb.

  • The EPA says open a window and ventilate the room for 15 minutes.
  • Then use cardboard to sweep up the remains of the bulb
  • Wearing rubber gloves, use a wet paper towel to wipe the area.
  • Finally, seal it all in a plastic bag, and dispose.
  • The EPA says do not vacuum the room, or you could spread mercury dust around.

The EPA says the amount in one bulb is not enough to create a health hazard.

To prevent problems

To prevent problems, and extend bulb life, the EPA suggests you:

  • Do not use CFL bulbs in bathrooms, or anywhere they will be turned on and off all day.  Frequent powering up and down reduces their life.
  • Do not use standard CFL’s in dimmer switches. Low voltage reduces their life
  • Three-way lamps are fine, however, as the contacts on the base of CFL bulbs are different from three-way bulbs, and they will not turn on with the low voltage setting.

So while a bulb explosion may scare you, it’s unlikely it will cause a fire or any real damage.

And despite Internet rumors, a broken bulb will not turn your home into a Hazmat zone.

The government says it is safe to continue using them.  As always, don’t waste your money.

In the Future You Will Listen To Lightbulbs..maybe May 18, 2010

Posted by Dr. Z Bulbs in light bulb, Weird Bulb News.
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Sylvania combines speakers and light bulbs, oddly

While Sylvania isn’t the first to combine light bulbs and speakers, the idea is sound. Okay, sorry. But consider the placement of a couple of lamps in your living room. Wouldn’t those locations also be suitable for speakers? Yes? Then MusicLite is for you.

Each one of these fixtures has an array of LEDs on board that emit as much light as a 65-watt incandescent, while cranking out 25 watts of sound at the same time. The speakers are all connected wirelessly, and can be placed 90 feet away from each other. Hide a subwoofer under the couch, and you’re ready to rock.

Too bad you’ll have to wait until Fall to find out the price of these clandestine light/speaks, but if you’re itching for some now, Klipsch might beat Sylvania to the punch with the same thing, with Klipsch saying theirs are “coming soon.” However, the Klipsch models will rip you for $600. Maybe these will be cheaper.

https://www.zbulbs.com

Zoinks!Changing Light Bulbs Can Be Dangerous! May 6, 2010

Posted by Dr. Z Bulbs in Weird Bulb News.
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Gadzooks.. This story certainly illustrates the dangers of changing lightbulbs.. Climbing Everest is dangerous but climbing a ladder to change a lightbulb..that can be lethal! Our condolences go out to all who knew and loved Marco Da Pozzo.

Man survives K2 climb only to die while fixing a light bulb at ski resort

Man survives K2 climb only to die while fixing a light bulb at ski resort
In 2004, elite climber Marco Da Pozzo successfully climbed the world’s second highest mountain, K2. Recently, however, it was the act of changing a lightbulb that took his life.Marco was changing a bulb on the church roof of the Cortina D’Ampezzo ski resort in Italy when he lost his footing and slammed his body against the stone wall, causing life-ending injuries. He was wearing safety gear.

Father David Fiocco commented: “We were all looking upwards holding our hands and praying but it was in vain and now he is in the hands of Jesus”. Fellow mountaineer Franco Gaspari said: “It was a freak tragedy. He was an outstanding climber.”

Our condolences go out to all who knew and loved Marco Da Pozzo. He was 43-years-old.

Chinese man munches on 1500 ‘crispy, delicious’ lightbulbs! May 4, 2010

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Once you get past the crunchy glass shell the burst of flavor from the tungsten filament is to die for!

Zowie! Not many people are aware of the ancient practice of eating lightbulbs..Umm probably for good reason considering all the glass.. wire.. and metal… sheesh! I suppose you can develope a taste for anything. I prefer mine in their sockets.. Read below and shudder..
Dr. Z

http://www.zbulbs.com

Melbourne, May 4 (ANI): A middle-aged man claims to have eaten 1500 light bulbs over his life after developing a liking for their crispness.

Buzz up!Metro newspaper in the UK reports that Wang Xianjun, 54, of Sichuan Province, started to snack on broken glass because he says it is “crispy and delicious.”

“I accidentally swallowed a piece of thick fish bone, but nothing happened. With curiosity, I tried several pieces of broken glasses secretly and nothing happened also,” the Daily Telegraph quoted him as saying.

“I am not eating it every day, but from time to time. I only eat the light bulb during my breakfast, and each day no more than one bulb,” he said.

Wang first smashes the light bulb before swallowing it piece by piece, sipping from a glass of water. (ANI)

The Neon Museum April 27, 2010

Posted by Dr. Z Bulbs in Weird Bulb News.
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ZOinks! There is probably no city more associated with lights than Las Vegas! Lights have been an integral part of Sin City! Now a cool new museum has dedicated itself to the great light signs of the past! Check out the Neon Museum!

http://www.neonmuseum.org./

Dr. Z

Get Lit and Stay Lit

https://www.zbulbs.com

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